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Castanea dentata (American chestnut)

Description

The American chestnut once was one of the largest trees in Eastren United States. Because of a parasite, it is now a rare stump sprout in the forest and seldom, if ever, a large tree. Because they rarely reach mature size, they rarely show their flowers—light-tan catkins. The female flowers produce green burs that split into four sections to release about four edible "chestnuts". The parasite (the chesntut blight) produces a canker that eventually encirles previously healthy stems and kills them.
Edible Parts: Shelled chestnuts are edible raw.

Images

tree:

The American chestnut once was one of the largest trees in Eastren United States. Because of a parasite it is now a rare stump sprout in the forest and seldom, if ever, a large tree.
leaf:
Castanea dentata has toothed leaves.
twig:
Castanea dentata twigs are chestnut colored with many bright lenticels.
pests:
Because of a parasite (the chesntut blight), American chestnuts are now rare stump sprouts in the forest and seldom, if ever, large trees. The chestnut blight produces a canker that eventually encirles previously healthy stems and kills them.